End of September

Here’s where we’re at…

2 turkeys went to Freezer Camp…Dingus and an auburn Narragansett.
Still have the rest of the whites to do, and another tom.
2 muscovy drakes joined them.
They were dicks and needed to be culled from the flock…leaving us 3 drakes to over winter with the hens and younglings.
1 pekin drake has been done.
We ordered 10 pekin ducklings and in a very odd twist, it seems like we got 2 drakes and 8 hens. That’s wild, because normally you get more boys than girls.
So we have to narrow down the last of the pekin hens we’re keeping and butcher the rest.
3 geese are in the freezer too.
Leaving us our breeding pair.

Garden is starting to clear out.
All but 4 tomato plants are stripped and pulled.
Beans are done (except for my blue lake pole beans and my rattlesnake beans, which I’m leaving as long as possible for seeds).
I’m working on pulling carrots, beets and onions.
Then I’ll mow the entire thing and cover with straw.
I moved a few rhubarb plants to new spaces, and I’m working on an asparagus bed.

I have the chance to get some horseradish plants later on this fall, so I have to get my 1/2 whiskey barrel planters situated where I want that.
I love horseradish and love the idea of growing it, but it can take over fast, so it must be contained.
The barrels moved out here with us from the city house and have sat empty of plants since.
It’s time for them to be filled.

Our load of duck eggs in the incubator produced 4 ducklings.
2 strong ones (so far, knock on wood), 2 that needed help to emerge and ended up passing.
The incubator has a difficult time keeping humidity levels high enough for ducks (I really hate styrofoam incubators…like really, really hate them), so sadly, it ends up shrink wrapping the poor little dudes into the membrane within the shell and suffocating them.
So eff that crap.
I’m on the hunt for a better incubator for doing ducks.
Something that can hold humidity better.
I fear I may have to make a bigger investment than I want too…
But
As far as sustainability goes, it would be a good investment, because of course, there are other birds here to incubate as well as ducks, so it’s not like it won’t get used. Often.

We moved the little chickens (10 each lavender orpingtons and jersey giants) into the main chicken coop.
It’s only been 1 night, and they’re confused af about not being able to get back into their former house (that’s where the 2 ducklings are), but after a night or two of being carried back to the right coop, they’ll get it.
We have at least 7 roosters between the 2 breeds, so I have good pick for who gets to stay and who gets to be fajitas.
Then next spring we’ll be able to hatch chickens out again.
EmmaBird the turkey and her 8 kids got a yard added to their brooder…with a lid so she can’t screw off on them and the chickens can’t get in to steal the kids’ foods.
Littles get a high protein feed that the regular chickens just don’t need…but everyone loves like it’s candy. And I ain’t payin’ $30/55lbs to feed it to laying hens when they have their own feed to eat!

And of course, we’re still cleaning up the yard and getting ready for the next season.
I’ll tell ya, that spring flooding kicked the crap out of our back yard.
It’s so overgrown with horrible weeds that I can’t use the regular lawn mower on, Hubby has to use the tractor mower, but with all the stupid little chickens hiding in there, it hasn’t happened yet (and because we have other things that have taken precedence over mowing…). Hopefully soon.
I really would love to see *grass* growing next year, but I fear I’ll have to sow some seed for that to happen.
*sigh*
I guess I’ll worry about it next spring, after we see what this winter has planned for us.
:/

Mid-September

And things are rolling right along.
The green/duck house walls are up, the metal floor is in.
Next week we pick up the OSB sheathing for the walls, then insulate, roof, door and move the little feathered arses in…
We’ll paint once they’re moved in.

Garden is still producing.
I’ve been growing out San Marzano tomatoes for the Northern Seed Library.
The tomatoes are finally starting to get a blush on them…so I’ll give them this next week of nice weather/heat and then pick them before the damn stink bugs get them.
Soon I’ll be pulling carrots and beets and canning those.
Beans are done. Ready to have the lawn mower run over them and be covered in a layer of straw.
Rhubarb has been transplanted.
Now I have 8 plants.
Harvested enough off the 2 main plants this year to have enough to share with my Uncle and make a small batch of wine.
Getting ready to start an asparagus patch.
A big one.
Not just a few plants in a raised bed, but more like a 5′ x 10′ space.
We like asparagus and perennial food plants are awesome.
Plus, since I have aaaaaallllllll these boxes and so many coops to clean, might as well put that cardboard and shit laden straw to good use as the foundation of a new gardening space.
Tomorrow (was gonna be today but that asshole named “migraine” has shown his shitty face) I’ll pick the apples off the 3 trees.
Still have the hawthorn berries to harvest (hopefully it’s not too late for them), stinging nettle seeds, and mullein too…then I think I might be done with herbals for this year…I think.

And then, we’re looking towards butchering…
There’s the turkeys, a few chickens, 3 geese, 5 pekins, and 2 muscovy to do this year.
Not too much, thankfully.
Though next month our pig should be ready.
That’ll be a slog.
I appreciate not having to raise it (a nearby farmer does it for us) and I hate paying to send them out to be butchered…so we do it. Which means a week of work for me, between the initial pick up day, put down, skin and breakdown into primals, then retail cuts, bone broth and canning…yup, takes me about a week.
And then I fall over from exhaustion for a day or two.
😂😂😂
Just in time for hunting season to start (for us)…

Oh, and there’s 29 muscovy eggs in the incubator.
All of which are showing excellent growth.
This is an experiment based on advice I was given to hatch muscovy in the incubator.
Typically, they’re more difficult to hatch than chickens or turkeys, so I haven’t had any luck previously.
So far, though, so good.
I expect they all oughta hatch because I’m not sure where to put 29 ducklings this close to winter…
That would be my luck.
😂😂😂
But this is also the best time of year to experiment, because we’re not letting hens sit, but they’re laying eggs. Spring eggs are for babies that we leave the hens to hatch.
But it sure wold be nice if I could grab a bunch and set ’em in the incubator *then* let the hens do as they please…
So we’ll see what happens.

And then there’s the other myriad of things that need doing before the dreaded snow falls…
1. get the snowblower looked at (already in talks with my brother on that)
2. put up the snow fencing…and extra of it.
3. move brooders so they aren’t buried under the snow drifts again
4. get hay home for The Merry Mares
5. get straw for coops and horses home
6. find winter boots for The Kid and I
7. find ski pants for The Kid…she wore hers right the fuck out last winter…

I’m sure I’m missing things…I’m always missing *something*.
And through this all, we’re still dealing with Hubby’s random vertigo attacks that fuck things up for days at a time. But we’ll muddle through, as always, because that’s what we do.
🙂

Have a helluva week folks!

So This is Happening…

Remember I said we’re building a new coop for the ducks?
Lies.
All lies.
😂😂😂

What we’re doing is *better*.
Check this out:

That’s my greenhouse going up…and it’s gonna do double duty.
See, we needed something with a bigger floorplan for the ducks, and I need a greenhouse for 3 seasons of the year…do why let it sit empty in winter when…we can shove ducks in there!!

So that’s the plan.
Duck house in winter, by the time it’s time to put plants in there to prep them for the garden, out go the ducks to their normal spring/summer/fall coop.
And because our fat butted ducks don’t like to fly to perch, I might be able to get away with starting a few seeds in there…we’ll see.
It’ll be worth playing with and testing.
It night work, it might not.
I won’t know ’til I try it.
Either way, greenhouse is up, and finishing work continues…

Almost September

I’m not ready for Fall.
Not even remotely.
😂😂😂

There’s still so much to do before that nasty “w” season hits.
This weekend we’re working on a duck coop…part of our problem last year was the coop we have just didn’t keep everyone warm enough. Even with heat.
And, if you remember, it got buried after we were hammered repeatedly by blizzard after blizzard after blizzard.
So we’re building something else. Bigger foot print, taller for ease of entry for humans, better insulated for ducky health. Not that I really want to build something, but, in order to keep the flock healthy, we need to.
So we will.

Meanwhile, the garden is rolling along.
Huge, growing like crazy, starting to produce…at least, that which the grass hoppers haven’t eaten.
I’ll have enough tomatoes to make a batch of wine.
There’s a ton of carrots and beets…
Well here’s pictures:

There is so much food in there…I just have to wade in and bring it out.
And put as much as I can into jars for winter.
Also in the pictures, where I’ve been cutting the grass short to work on the ever expanding garden.
I need to prep a bed for raspberry canes, to put a couple rhubarb plants, an area for asparagus, and figure out where to put a half barrel for horseradish.
I also have 4 grape cutting growing like mad that I want to plant this weekend.
And, if I have a chance to harvest any grapes (there’s tons of bunches, but will the grasshoppers get them? We’ll have to see…) that’ll be awesome. I’m also going to grab a couple dozen more cuttings to get rooted and growing over winter.

And then there’s the meat birds to get into the freezer.
Coops to clean (which goes hand in hand with that garden expansion very nicely…) and after coops are cleaned out and the bedding piled into the spots, I’ll get Hubby to spend a day or so bringing me bucket after bucket of rotten horse crap to top the chicken bedding/crap. Then that can all cook down over winter to become plantable in the spring.

On top of all that, we’re on our 3rd day in a row of Loop pickup.
That’s the food waste from grocery stores reduction program we’re a part of.
Feeding food waste to farm animals.
Welp, we were offered a coverage pickup Sunday.
We said yes.
We were offered another coverage pickup Monday.
We said yes.
Today is our regular bi-weekly pickup.
So 3 days in a row…
I am not complaining.
Not even a little bit!
It’s a lot of work to sort and process and feed out, but damn, it’s a huuuuuuge help on the feed bill.
Especially with the pekins, white turkeys, and geese.
These birds…I tell ya, they could eat a farmer out of house and home!
😂😂😂
But they love the produce, the bakery stuff, the dairy…every one is growing beautifully and is super healthy.
And, we’ve been offered a weekly pickup at one of the stores we typically do random coverage pickups on…so YAY for that!

Going into winter, we’re looking at 5 pekins staying (for breeding next year), a pair of geese (for the same reason) and the muscovies. We have 2 drakes that are leaving the breeding program. Neither one have desirable traits to continue in the program, so they’re gonna go camping. Freezer camping. 😉
Of the 3 ducklings we had hatch (another reason to have a 2nd duck coop, to have a bachelor pen come broody season…hard for hens to successfully hatch when the boys are being pains int he butt), we know we have 1 hen and 1 drake for sure. The 3rd, little Potato (yep, a duckling named Potato), we’re not sure yet…leaning towards drake, but it’ll be a few weeks before we know for sure.
Then come spring we’ll do some cross fencing in the duck yard so we can pair off certain hens with the best drakes and so we can extend the lives of our current drakes…by that I mean, some of the boys, once they have fathered too many ducklings, go onto freezer camp. But if we rotate them though hens, tracking which keeper hens are parented by whom, we can cycle them through the drakes with very little inbreeding.

And then…
Just for even more fun.
Our local mega mart has gotten in their cases of roma tomatoes.
Look, I *want* to say that I’ve 1000% figured out our micro climate and am rolling in the tomatoes so much so that I have more than I can put up…but I’d be lying.
So I watch the local canning groups for reports of the 1/2 bushels arriving, and when that happens, I send the Hubby off to get me some.
If I wait beyond the first week craziness, the prices tend to drop and I can get 3-400lbs of tomatoes for a really good price.
Then comes the canning.
And the crying.
And the reminding myself that there’s no crying in canning!!
Oh yeah, and the insane loopiness.
Which is alleviated with a nice cold drink at the end of the day.

Ah well, soon enough the summer/fall work will be done, and we’ll transition seasons.
As always, the wheel continues to turn…

August

Not sure how it’s gotten to be August already, but I’m not ready for it to be August already.
Not like anyone asks me if I’m ready, or anything…
😂😂😂

Today was “take away all the duck eggs from the broody duck hens” day.
Which was not really fun, because 9 broody duck hens all trying to lob off broody duck hen shit at you for stealing their babies is really, really disgusting.
And, those bitches can aim.
Which is why you *never* pick up a broody duck hen.
Rubber boots must be worn, and you kinda scoot ’em along out of the coop, while a 2nd person makes sure they don’t dash right back in.

I candled all the eggs.
59 of them.
Gave 11 that look like they might be within a week or so of hatching to the broody chicken hens on the deck.
The rest were either not developing (too fresh) or really, really rotten.
Listen, when a black egg sloshes, you hold that veeeeerrry carefully while you dash to the fire pit where you’re gonna toss ’em.
You never want to have a rotten egg burst in your hand.
Ever.
🤢🤮

So that’s that.
From here on out, we collect duck eggs daily to try to break the hens of their broodiness.
Then the girls can just enjoy the rest of the summer being ducks, instead of sitting nests and chirping.

~~~~~~~~~~~~

Stupid turkeys were out this morning.
The whites are getting bigger and bigger, and they keep following the grasshoppers all over the place.
Unfortunately, one place they follow them to is the road in front of our property…and I can’t have my dumbass birds out on the municipal road. They’re too stupid to move for vehicles, and I don’t want anyone getting hurt because my birds are stupid.
So we have built them a yard (which does need to be expanded), with a top on it…but we don’t worry about keeping the top on when they’re locked in their coop at night…well, I guess I forget to latch their door properly, and the jerks pushed their way out this morning.
The whites were easy to catch…
They see me, The Food Lady, and come running…
So I scooped them up and dropped them back into their yard, except for the few who dashed off into the tall weeds hooting “fuck you Lady, you’ll never catch us!!”
Except I will come supper time for sure because their turkey bellies will cry for foods and there’s none out anywhere for them to steal from other birds…eat bugs and weeds or go without…and eventually they’ll come back for the easy to eat stuff…and I I just might give everyone who was a good bird and stayed in their pen some hard boiled eggs today…that will show ’em to stay the fuck home.
😂😂😂

~~~~~~~~~~~~

Dingus the Narragansett is out of the garage now.
Took a bit longer than I wanted…truth be told, I was just going to butcher him, but I have no freezer space right now.
So he’s in a brooder with his own yard.
It’s not a huge space, but it’s infinitely better than being in the garage long-term, and he gets to get outside now…so he’ll spend the rest of summer strutting and dancing, trying to convince any bird that comes near him how amazingly handsome he is, and then in the Fall, he’ll go to Freezer Camp.

Emma, one of my Narragansett hens, has gone off on walkabout.
I’m 98% certain I know where she is, and even more certain she’s sitting a nest.
In the former pig/duck yard, the weeds have grown to 6 feet in height (I really should find some herbivore to put in there to eat them, but time and money have been short) and I’m pretty sure she’s in there…she’s been seen going in and out of the hutch in there, but she’s not sitting in there.
And, I’m not motivated enough to wander through the weeds to see if I can find her…
She’ll either return in 25ish days (she’s been gone solid for 3 days) with some poults or she won’t return…and if she doesn’t return, I’ll assume a coyote got her.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Garden is growing well.
Pulled out all the pea plants and harvested those.
Now I’m replanting for a Fall crop.
Still working on weeding and mulching…that’s gonna happen until everything is pulled out.
Beans are flowering gangbusters.
Same with San Marzano tomatoes.
Other tomatoes are a bit behind, but, we’ll see what happens.
My stinging nettles are ready for their next harvest…I’ll be cutting them severely to harvest for teas, tinctures, and fertilizer.
They’re tough as hell plants, so I don’t worry about them coming back next year.
Once I do that, I can open the gate for The Merry Mares to go back into the front pasture.

Mullein is ready for harvest too.
I ran the still for my tincture base, so I’m ready to get that going.
I feel like the mullein tincture is going to be an important one this winter.
That and the elderberry syrup…and hyssop cough syrup…
Not interested in getting into any political/world debates, just feel like I need to do everything I can to take care of mine.
No one else in this world is going to, I sure the hell am.

Haying is rolling along too…
There’s a lot of grass out there to get cut still.
The feed she dis filling nicely with hay bales.
The stuff that got rained on too many times has entertained the ducks and geese immensely.
We used it as bedding for them once it finally dried.
It was too dusty for the Mares, but perfect for a bunch of crazy birds to dig through and poop in.

Fall is coming.
So is winter.
It’s getting busier, with us trying to get everything done we need to get done, plus anything extra.
I hope that winter will be less of an asshole to us this year.
Fingers crossed.
😂😂😂

Monty

Monty didn’t make it.
If you follow me on Instagram, or we’re friends on FB, you already knew that.
Sadly, chicks that need help to hatch have a low chance of survival.
But, I always try.
I always want to give life a chance.
Sometimes, oft times, I lose to Death.
Sometimes tho…sometimes, I win.
Like with 13 the Turkey (who is one of my best layers and broodies).
And Lefty the chicken, who brought me her clutch of 5 chicks last Fall.
So I always try…

Anyways…
I said I’d keep y’all updated, and there, now y’all know.
Yesterday I just took the day to putter in the garden and sit with the grief of it.
I know he was just a 2 day old duck, who likely was gonna end up in Freezer Camp, but still…
We have a connection to our food animals here.
When you raise them, and love them, and give them the best life they can have, there is a connection that makes you hurt when you lose one prematurely.
And it’s not because of the loss of food, it’s the loss of the life that leads up to that…
There was no chance to swim and splash.
No chance to chase bugs. Or play with other ducks. Or waddle about to and fro like ducks like to do.
That’s what I was…am…mourning.
The life that leads up to the moment, that one bad moment, where the food animals fulfill their destiny.
I might be a bit soft for Farm Life.

And, I know I can avoid that grief by not helping chicks out of shells, but, as I said…
I always want to give Life a chance.
Always.
That’s just me.

Last night we sat on the deck, with music and wobbly pops and bbq.
And in one quiet moment, The Kid says “I hear chirping…and it’s not Bart!”
We looked at the cat house where the broody hens were…
I reached in under those hens and found a wee surprise:

Bart standing, new baby sitting.

And so now we’re back at 2.
Life.
She’ll always find Her way.

Babies

We have some chickens who insist, and I mean *insist*, that they need to be broody.
Big problem is, we don’t currently have a working rooster.
We lost all our boys over the winter, and none of the oprpingtons or jersey giant boys are ready for working with full sized hens.
Them boys is just too young.
But, one should never let a broody hen go to waste if they can help it.
Last year we had a broody hatch out a dozen ducklings.
So we gave these bitches, who had taken over the cat house from the cats on the deck, duck eggs.

Now, every couple of days I go in and look for chicken eggs and take those away.
Because…egg bombs are gross.
I had found a duck egg with a huge peck/crack in it, so I took it away…only to crack it and find a baby (still breathing) in it.
I can’t convey how awful I felt because there was no way at all to save that baby.
So I did the kindest thing.
And had a good cry afterwards.
😥

Since that egg, I candled the others under the brody chickens, and found 2 that I was pretty sure were rotting, but I left them just in case I was wrong.
Figured if they went past 45 days under the hens (muscovy take 35 days and sometimes longer to hatch) then I’d toss ’em into the fire.
Welp, good thing I didn’t.
This little numpkin was found wandering on the deck:

Hatching and running away from your chicken moms and then being scooped up by a giant and being held is hard work!

After finding this one, I checked the eggs underneath the hens…
Another on had pipped.
Typically after pipping, the chick will “unzip” the egg shell, making it into 2 halves, then kick it’s way out.
Sometimes, that doesn’t happen.
But, we always give the babies the chance to do it on their own.
They’re always stronger if they can get themselves out.

So we waited for the day.
But the 2nd baby didn’t get past the pipping stage.
So I intervened.

I’ve helped many chickens, a few turkeys, but never a duckling.
I don’t know if the blood was normal.
But, if I didn’t get baby out, they were going to die either way.
I figured if they made it through the night, they earned a name.

So, meet Monty…

My brain says Monty ain’t gonna make it…but my heart says it won’t be a for a lack of trying.

🖤
🖤
🖤

I’ll keep y’all posted…

Inkspot Microdwarf Tomatoes

Way back in the fall, I joined a seed swap on Instagram.
It was a fun way to share seeds from our areas and seeds from plants we love.
The host, Ash from Grower’s Blend, gifted participants with seeds from her own shop.
She sent me both Gun Metal Grey tomatoes and Inkspot microdwarf tomatoes.
I am a huge tomato nerd and was over joyed with these seed packets.

So a few weeks ago, after a discussion with Hubby about growing food indoors, I decided to start some of the Inkspots. They’re little, can be kept as a houseplant easily, and they make food.
Gotta like that.
So into some potting soil went 5 seeds.
All 5 sprouted.
And look how damn cute these wee tomatoes are!

For scale, I started them in those individual yogurt serving cups.
(please remember, I don’t buy those yogurt cups, we get them in our Loop food waste for farm animals pickups)
Doesn’t help?
Okay, here’s one with my coffee cup for scale…

It’s a big cup, about 5 inches tall, holds several traditional cups of coffee at a time.
Because coffee is life, ya know?

Anyways, the tomatoes…
Almost ready for their next pots.
I’ve a handful of 3/4 gallon pots that will be their permanent homes and we’ll see how they do.
If nothing else, the happiness factor of having houseplants (with cats who don’t really care about them) is worth something.

🙂

Around the Farm

It’s that busy time of year where just about everything has to be done all at the same time…
Garden needs weeding and mulching.
Hay needs cutting, raking, baling.
Animals need yards, moving, shifting, getting outdoors.
And the regular day-to-day stuff still has to happen too…laundry, dishes, cleaning the house…
Give it a couple of months and we’ll be adding canning, and butchering to the list of things that need doing.
I, uh, mighta started this Farming thing a bit late in life…I’m tired.
But it’s a good tired, so not much complaining is happening.
😉

So how’s things going?

Duck and goose babies now have regular outdoor time.
That makes keeping their coop cleaner much easier.
All the food and water is out in their yard, and most of the pooping happens out there too.
😂😂😂
They’re growing like mad, eating weeds from the garden, produce from Loop, and fermented grains.
The ducks are starting to quack like normal ducks, which confuses the hell out of the muscovies.
Genetically, muscovies are similar to geese, so they don’t speak the same “duck” as mallard derived ducks.
Instead of quacking (noisily, I might add!!) muscovies trill (girls) and hiss (boys). They are much, much, much quieter than pekins!

Garden is all planted.
Except for the few stragglers I keep seeming to bring home from the local greenhouse.
Yesterday another 14 tomato plants arrived.
😂😂😂
1 is specifically for in the house, and at least 1 other will come in too…but most will be fit into spare small spots in the garden.
As has been explained to me, there is no such thing as “no more room to plant”, much like there is no such thing as “no more room for books”.
It is true.

Hubby and The Kid got the fencing up around my Ruth Stout garden yesterday.
While I pulled thistles out of the haying area.
I don’t mind feeding the mares weeds…in fact, many weeds are good for them (some aren’t of course, but those are removed), like thistles are (they’re excellent for liver health), but too many in a bale of hay won’t get eaten…and a certain Palomino Princess has been known to eat dried thistles and get stickers stuck inside her mouth/lips.
That’s not a good time to deal with, especially since her 1 fault is having humans doing anything near/in her mouth.
I no longer give her worming pastes…not after having been lifted 3 feet in the air by her halter as she reared to get away from the tube of funky goo.
It’s just not a good time and it ain’t worth fighting with her.
When she gets her teeth floated, she’s drugged before the vet sticks his hand in…
Trust me, it’s the best for everyone.
No one wins when fighting 1500lbs.
Anyways…
I pulled a massive load of thistles out and fed them to all the birds.
Ducks and geese just plain love any food we give them, so they got the bulk of them.

The Kid fashioned a yard for the first brooder of turkey babies and they got a chance to get outside for the first time ever yesterday.

It was a bit scary at first, but then they came out and discovered their pile of thistles.
Then the singing and cooing started.
And then the dust bathing…
They were doing great until Daphne ran by and well, apparently, dogs are terrifying to little turkeys who’ve never seen such a thing before!
😂😂😂

There’s also the foraging harvests to do…
Stinging nettles, pineapple weed, lamb’s quarters, yarrow (which I discovered we’ve had for a while, but didn’t realize, so I’ve planted it for next year…this year I can harvest the wild…), thistles for teas (because liver health 😉 ), some prairie sage, and soon, chokecherries and hawthorn berries, and saskatoons…
Some will be dried for teas, much will be made into tinctures, some will become salves/balms.

Then, I planted some poblano seeds for indoor peppers.
Some Inkspot micro dwarf tomatoes for indoor tomatoes.
And I took a small tendril off the grape vine so I can try propagating it.
And so on, and so forth…

Have a great week folks.
🙂

So Frickin’ Close

I only have tomato plants left to get into the garden.
Well, aside from a few random winter sown plants that just need to establish before the Fall so they can come back next year…

But, for the big, need to harvest this year stuff…
Tomatoes.

Yesterday I got the Ruth Stout potato patch planted.
That’s the garden expansion in front of the house that will continue to expand as we go…
I also mixed up a wheelbarrow load of well rotted equine poo with some topsoil and a bit of potting soil I had left over from starting seeds in the house, then laid it down in a line at the edge of the straw mulch garden, and planted rattlesnake pole beans there.
After the rains stop today, I’ll get out there with the scythe and cut the grass down around it, so that this weekend we can put up the fencing to a. protect growing plants from chickens, and b. for the pole beans to climb up on.

Then I got a line of raspberry canes planted.
A friend had mentioned she needed to thin her patch and asked if I wanted the canes she dug out…
Um, yes please!
So those are in, and getting rained on today.
So now, just the tomatoes.
And cutting hay…then the raking and the baling.
To go with the weeding, mulching and random watering.
So there you have it…
Summer is underway, and we’re busy, as usual.
Soon enough, harvests will start to come in, and then I’ll be working on putting those foods up…

As ever the wheel continues to turn and we must go along with it.
Happy Summer Solstice all!
Hope you enjoy the day…and the days of summer ahead!
🙂