Borage and Other Garden Stuff

I had winter sown some borage seeds.
I waited a long time to finally see the wee teeny seedling come up.
And then I forgot about it in the container for a while.
Finally, I got around to putting it into the garden…not in any particular spot, just in a “oh, there’s a space, let’s plant something there!” spot.
I had no real expectation of it doing much of anything…

Until this morning when this greeted me:

So, now I’ll let this plant self seed for next year.
One of the things about winter sowing is that the plants that *do* come up and produce are best to save seeds from (or let self seed) because they’re acclimatized to your micro climate.
Since my micro climate can be incredibly harsh (even though we’re zone3 over all, my micro climate can oft times be zone2) anything that acclimatizes here (that we can use) will be encouraged.

Other goings on include:

Volunteer tomatoes coming up all over the place.
There’s easily 6 of them, maybe more in the weeds….shhhhh, we won’t talk about the fact that I’m behind on weeding…
These are from composted tomatoes from Loop.
Who knows what kinda tomatoes we’ll get from these plants, but if they’re tasty, I’ll save seeds from them and give them another shot next year.
There’s also a whole lot of ground cherries coming up…I was warned that growing them once typically means having them forever…that’s fine with me!
Ground cherries are delicious!
So having a whole bunch of volunteers come up is awesome.
I hope to have enough to make a batch of wine with them.
I think they’d make a very tasty wine.

And the mullein (and a few other of the medicinals) are growing beautifully.
They’ve been getting a weekly application of the stinging nettle tea, so they’re just about ready for a small harvest…enough that thins them out nicely and gives me enough for winter tinctures.

Plus, the stinging nettles, that some lovely horse πŸ™„πŸ€¦β€β™€οΈ decided to munch the beautiful tops off of, are ready for another harvest, and to made into a tincture. As well as more dried for winter teas.
And the bonus is, the stems will be chopped and fermented into fertilizer.

Slowly but surely, we’re getting things done.
πŸ™‚